More on the Millennial Worker

I was looking for a page defining what a Millennial was for a friend and I came across this article from 2 years ago that I think hits the nail on the head – not for her purposes, but for mine. The article is from http://www.ltimagazine.com/ltimagazine and it’s titled “Millennial” Learning: On Demand Strategies for Generation X and Beyond.

The article talks about what employers need to provide in order to keep their Millennial employees.

According to the staffing firm Spherion, five core factors significantly influence whether employees stay or go: culture and work environment, compensation, supervisor role, and – the two retention drivers indicating employers need to focus on employee development – training and development, and growth and earning potential. Spherion’s study indicates employers are scoring low with workers in these areas. Today’s new breed of workers requires an adapted approach to employee development.

In order to build suitable training for today’s learner, organizations must tailor training by addressing key characteristics of this new breed. Research reveals that today’s younger worker values:

  • Relevant development
  • Rich experiences
  • Flexibility
  • Community
  • Technology
  • Instant results

(Emphasis added by me)

I’ve had this very conversation with many Millennials (including myself). We want to learn – at least those I talk to want to learn (there are always black sheep). There is always this mentality among employers that if you train someone to do something new, they’re going to leave and do that something somewhere else – and that is a risk, but at the same time, if I’m not allowed to learn something new (which I am!) then I’m going to look elsewhere.

Just an interesting little article I thought I’d share with you all.

8 comments

  1. You wrote: “There is always this mentality among employers that if you train someone to do something new, they’re going to leave and do that something somewhere else – and that is a risk, but at the same time, if I’m not allowed to learn something new (which I am!) then I’m going to look elsewhere.”

    Or, as one of my former (software engineering) bosses used to reply, “What if you don’t train them and they stay?”

  2. That’s possible too – but I’m in the “I won’t stay” club – which I guess is something I have in common with many other Millennials.

  3. I’m always a little sceptical about these articles that say “Millenials” [or Xers or Boomers] want such and such. Pretty much all those things on your list are actually standard across generations (or, at least, when I was studying industrial psychology over a decade ago, the research pointed out that workers wanted flexibility, development, rich experiences more than a big paycheck).

    That said: instant results and technology might be things that Millennials value more than other generations.

    I certainly don’t think those are bad points; I think they are good ones. But painting them all as things that are only, or especially, relevant to Millennials, I’m not so sure about.

  4. Simon, I agree that you can’t make generalizations, but I find more young people asking for training than I do established employees – maybe it’s where I’ve worked…

  5. I agree, one shouldn’t generalize; but I think there are differences that go beyond the “Core” one’s you speak of. The “social” environment (for example) in the office is new.

    So how do you motivate/inspire the “millenial” worker to perform? Training and knowledge are great, but what about production?

  6. I agree, one shouldn’t generalize; but I think there are differences that go beyond the “Core” one’s you speak of. The “social” environment (for example) in the office is new.

    So how do you motivate/inspire the “millenial” worker to perform? Training and knowledge are great, but what about production?

  7. Don’t training and knowledge lead to a productive worker? It did for me. Whenever I got back from training I worked twice as hard to try and apply what I had learned – may just be my personality – I get very excited about learning and applying my new skills/knowledge – otherwise I lose them pretty quickly :)

  8. Don’t training and knowledge lead to a productive worker? It did for me. Whenever I got back from training I worked twice as hard to try and apply what I had learned – may just be my personality – I get very excited about learning and applying my new skills/knowledge – otherwise I lose them pretty quickly :)

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