Google Citations and Academia.edu

In the last couple of weeks I learned about Academia.edu and the new features of Google Scholar – both of which are very very similar.

Let’s start with Google Scholar – most you know about this service already, it’s a great way to find articles and books for your research. I sometimes spend a couple hours just searching for new open source articles to save to my Zotero Library and to read of course! Recently Google Scholar released a new feature (more here) – your personalized Scholar Profile:

We analyze your articles (as identified in your Scholar profile), scan the entire web looking for new articles relevant to your research, and then show you the most relevant articles when you visit Scholar. We determine relevance using a statistical model that incorporates what your work is about, the citation graph between articles, the fact that interests can change over time, and the authors you work with and cite.

So I went through the steps to set up my own profile and basically Scholar searched its database for articles that I had written or been cited in and the final product can be seen here. It’s kind of neat to see the graph at the top and see how many people are citing my various different publications. I would like a way to add more citations (and there might be a way that I’m just missing right now), but I’m sure it will improve as it grows.

Now, Academia.edu – maybe not be quite as well known, but is certainly more thought out in this particular area. Just like Google Scholar’s new profile page, Academia.edu lets you create your own profile where you list all of your publications. Unlike Scholar, Academia.edu is focused solely on listing your resources for others and linking you to other authors with similar research areas. There is no fancy chart or count of who’s citing your articles (like on Scholar) but there are more social functions as well as the ability to add your own citations and upload your own files. From the about page:

Academics use Academia.edu to share their research, monitor deep analytics around the impact of their research, and track the research of academics they follow. 1,772,914 academics have signed up to Academia.edu, adding 1,525,276 papers and 533,440 research interests. Academia.edu attracts over 3.9 million unique visitors a month.

You can see my full profile here.

I think that with the combo of both tools (and of course a Zotero library) an author can keep really good information on their areas of research and who’s citing their publications!

3 comments

  1. Thanks for the update on the changes with Google Scholar. It’s interesting to see what they do with the vast amount of information, processing power, and talent available to them. I’m curious why you see Academia as more useful. Is it mostly the social features?

    I’ve included a link to my profile on Mendeley, which you might also want to check out. I’d love to know your thoughts!

  2. I think it’s just personal preference, it looks more useful to the way I ingest information.

    As for Mendeley, that’s even more thorough than the other options. Kind of like an academic LinkedIn with you CV and awards and such also listed.

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