OSCON Keynote: Open Source: The Secret Ingredient

OSCON

Todd Greene from Media Temple was up next.

He started talking about Linux – how it’s 1 platform with 6 different interpretations. Todd used the example of the ‘omelet’ in this comparison. The secret ingredient in omelet making – in open source software – is YOU.

MT came up with a set of values to making open source successful:

  • work with extraordinary people

  • get things done
  • always been curious
  • enjoy the journey

OSCON Keynote: The Joy of Flying Robots with Clojure

OSCON

For our next speaker, Carin Meier, we were asked to turn off our devices so that we could watch demos of clojure controlled robots. We watched Carin control her roomba and her drone from her computer – even making the two “friends” with each other.

Since I couldn’t live blog cause my computer had to be off, you can watch the video here:

OSCON Keynote: Creating Communities of Inclusion

OSCON

Up next was Mark Hinkle from Citrix.

Mark started by talking about we can include more people in our communities to make our software better!! First off, all communities are not created equal – and just because they’re different doesn’t mean one is any better or worse than the others. Open source communities all benefit from shared development.

Next up a quote I will be adding to my presentations : “If a new user has a problem, it’s a bug in the code or the documentation. End of Story.” – Jordon Sissel.

Karl Fogel author of ‘Producing Open Source Software’ is working on an updated version of his book in which he’s including the community in the process. The easier it is to make people contribute the more they’ll contribute.

Mark talked to us about the Open Prosthetic Project. The prosthetics used today are based on a 1912 patent! There was no way for people adapt that model to their needs – enter the Open Prosthetic Project.

View Mark’s keynote on YouTube.

OSCON Keynote: Open Compute Project

OSCON

Next up was Jay Parikh from Facebook to talk to us about the Open Compute Project. Jay jumped in to explain where the project has come since last year … but didn’t explain what the project was, so this is from the official site:

We started a project at Facebook almost two years ago with a pretty big goal: to build one of the most efficient computing infrastructures at the lowest possible cost. We decided to honor our hacker roots and challenge convention by custom designing and building our software, servers and data centers from the ground up – and then share these technologies as they evolve.

Jay talked about 2 projects that Open Compute is focusing (there are many more). The first was the OCP Networking project which focuses on creating a vendor agnostic switch to allow us to separate our hardware from our software – giving us more choices.

The next project focused on data – our photos in particular. There are over 200 billion photos on Facebook that are not accessed that often. Facebook can’t lose the photos and the users won’t accept if things slow down because the system has to store all of these photos in the same place. So what they decided to do was create a data storage center that was separate from the compute heavy server center. The goals of this new center were:

  • handle massive scale
  • they have to be durable – can’t lose data
  • they have to make things highly efficient

Jay then went in to more hardware-type information than this software girl could follow along with … but it all looked pretty darn impressive.

OSCON Keynote: On Open Intelligence

OSCON

The keynote was started with an intro by the conference organizers reminding us all that not having a license on our code is a bug not a feature! So go to http://choosealicense.com and pick the right license for your code and make sure you add it to your github account.

Our first speaker was Jeff Hawkins from Numenta Inc.

Jeff Hawkins at OSCONJeff talked to us about the human brain – the most interesting thing in the universe (according to him). He set out on a career to discover the operating principles of the neocortex (it’s just a bunch of cells – how hard could it be? – where have I heard that before?) and build systems based on those principles. The result of this was the Cortical Learning Algorithm (CLA) and NuPIC (Numenta Platform for Intelligent Computing).

Jeff started by explaining out the neocortex works … while it was interesting to listen to … I have no idea how to explain what I just learned to you all :) Jeff even said to us all “This stuff is hard!” so I don’t feel so bad.

CLA is the key building block for machine intelligence. NuPIC is the open source repository for CLA and it’s a community for machine intelligence based on cortical principles.