Today’s Bookmarks 09/03/2010

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

The reality of open source (aka Koha confusions)

This disclaimer is of course on the about page of this blog, but it bears repeating before I start:

Disclaimer: Please note that the words on this blog are my words and no one else’s. The opinions and views presented here are my personal views and not those of my employers.

Now that that’s out of the way…

The Background

For the last 3+ years I have had the pleasure of teaching librarians all about open source software. I have explained the nature of open source and the freedoms associated with it. I have explained the governance between most open source projects. I have repeatedly stated that you can tell the success of an open source project by the community behind it. Not just the size of that community – but the fervor with which that community supports the product they are developing and the mores behind free and open source. I then had the pleasure of repeating my lessons in an upcoming book on the topic.

It is for this reason that I get so very upset — not angry – although a little bit angry, but truly sad and upset — and frustrated when I see the news that is circling the product I have supported since I first learned of its existence in 2004 (before I even got to participate with and learn to love the members of the community)!! I talk here about the Koha open source ILS.

I talk here of the split of one of the vendors from the community, the fork of the code and then the subsequent purchase of said company. The split and fork are old news and we (the community) have moved on and gotten stronger because of it. We have voted to have a non profit organization be in control of all Koha assets and have started fresh with a whole new domain (one that meets the criteria the community has set forth – aka openness).

The Situation as it Stands Now

What upsets me now is the ignorance of those who bought said company (and I use the word with it intended definition – not the way it’s often used by kids these days). I don’t know why I let it bother me so much, but when I see something as so obvious it upsets me that I’m unable to make others see the same thing. Maybe it’s the educator in me, maybe it’s the stubborn Italian blood – who knows. It is for this reason that I write this post – this post which explains (whether you want to understand or not) the facts of open source, the facts of how Koha is governed and the facts of where we stand today.

When the sale of LibLime was announced, the community was cautiously optimistic. The web was full of posts of community members, outsiders and librarians alike thinking that maybe this meant that things could go back to normal, back to the way they were, back to one community working together as it should be instead of one company trying to make “community” sound like a bad word.

When the sale went through we all held our breath and waited. The holders of the community’s assets, the Horowhenua Library Trust (HLT), reached out to the new LibLime (now a division of PTFS) and asked what their intentions were for joining the community. Explaining that the community had voted to have HLT hold the Koha assets so that no one company (and no one with a financial interest in the software) could ever make such a mess of things (“mess of things” being my words not theirs). The response was not good, in fact the response didn’t exist. It wasn’t until months later that the committee at HLT had an update for the community and it didn’t sound promising.

But we’re not there yet in the story, so let’s go back to a few weeks ago when at least one member from a few select (no idea how they were selected) vendors supporting Koha was sent an email asking them to contribute their company press to koha.org via a proxy by the name of Kelly. Kelly informed us that she was now in charge of the news section of the site and would see that our news was posted. Poor Kelly obviously hadn’t been taught the ins and outs of open source before joining the “open source” support company as a marketing person. The community made it clear (as did the vendors who were emailed) that all news would be posted to the new official site and that no one person would ever be in charge of that site (unlike koha.org it would be open for all to sign up for accounts and add content as they see fit).

This message was shortly followed by a message from PTFS CEO, John Yokley, assuring the community that he understood that the koha-community.org site was set up as a temporary measure since koha.org was so out of date and that PTFS wanted community help in updating “parts” of koha.org. This too was responded to in true community fashion with librarians, vendors and community members explaining the actual facts – that the new site was the official site in the eyes of the community and the community’s opinion (remembering that the community is made of of developers, software users, fans of the product and support vendors alike) is all that matters when it comes to an open source project.

It is now that I’m starting to wring my hands in frustration, trying desperately to figure out how to educate these people so they would finally understand what kind of world they were joining by becoming an open source software support company. Maybe other projects are different – I’m not involved in any projects other than those in libraries – but it seems pretty clear to me that Koha was around for 9 years before this vendor came to support the product and Koha will be around for years to come – it doesn’t need nor does it want a company to take charge. The community has done an amazing job these last 10 years in creating a stable, mature, widely used product – why would anyone think that the project needed help – or needed a guardian with a financial interest in the software? The idea behind the development of Koha is that the software users (aka librarians) get to decide the direction the product goes in … all the librarians – and the only way that can happen for certain is if no one company is in charge and looking out only for their customers and their bottom line. It is for this reason that with each release a new ‘release manager’ is voted in – keeping the direction of the product always moving forward.

Sometime either during these email exchanges or after these email exchanges, a conference call was set up between the committee at HLT and someone(s) at PTFS (the first response, by the way, to the request to return the domain to the rightful owners – the community). It was after this call was scheduled that disagreements over the agenda and the time (since members of the committee are literally on the other side of the world from PTFS) that the committee decided to first approach the community with all the updates they had and cancel the call (a report that got members of other open source communities interested enough to write about).

Eleven days later PTFS let all their developments from the last year out into the wild in the form of what they call a ‘Release of Koha.’ Once again the initial reaction is positive. The community and librarians alike thank PTFS for sharing their code and showing that they’re willing to be open and have their developments integrated into official Koha releases. But in our excitement we seemed to have overlooked something

But here is where the mixed messages come in: “Harley” is prominently listed on koha.org as a release of Koha. Since no PTFS staff are among the elected release managers or maintainers for Koha, that is overreaching. Ever since Koha expanded beyond New Zealand, no vendor has hitherto unilaterally implied that they were doing mainstream releases of Koha outside of the framework of elected release managers.

You may be asking yourself, “So where’s the problem?” Well the problem is this – once again a vendor has taken it upon themselves to act as if they have the power to control a product that has been successfully developed and used for 9 years before they came along… Galen goes on to explain that forking the code is completely legal and happens all of the time, but this is not marketed as a fork (which is good), it’s marketed as an official Koha release (which is bad – and not true). The truth is this:

  • only a community elected release manager can announce an official release
  • developments in public git repositories (as this is) will be integrated into the official Koha releases as the manager sees fit (in the case of “Harley” here is the schedule put forth by the current and next release manager)

My Issues

This brings us to today – a day that started out pretty great for me – a day where I got to talk to my fellow librarians about the power of going open source and the awesomeness that is belonging to an open source community. But then I look back and I look at today’s posts and news items and I get frustrated again. There were some very timely articles I had read on open source recently, one stating that

Trust, in business, is considered hard to earn. But it’s easy to earn in open source, if you just give trust first. Giving trust proves you worthy of receiving trust.

Another brought home what I keep repeating about companies having different goals than the open source community:

For a corporation an open source project is just another puzzle piece, just another move on its board. It’s an asset. For a community, the project is more. It’s where you put your time, your loyalty. It may be where you put your love.

One thing I always say when teaching open source is that one of the benefits of choosing an open source product is because the developers love what they’re doing and they love the software they’re creating. Usually I get some giggles, but it’s the truth!! If we didn’t love what we were doing – if those who worked on Koha in the early days didn’t love what they were doing – then Koha would have never grown the way it has.

It is for this reason that those who just don’t get open source see what’s going on now as drama in Koha-land. When in reality it’s not drama, it’s a fact of open source development that companies will break off and do their own thing. It’s a fact that open source software can and may fork in two different directions. It’s a fact that the events of the past year have brought those who love Koha closer together and has made the community stronger and more productive.

What it boils down to is this – open source is about community! No matter how you look at it, no matter what you think you believe! Open source is about community and without the communities behind these applications there wouldn’t be products like Koha and the only way to run a successful business around supporting the original (not the forked) open source application is to join the community, get to know the members, earn their trust and work collaboratively on making one amazing product!

A Related Sneak Peak

In the chapter of the upcoming book on open source for libraries, the chapter on communities starts as follows:

Open source is about so much more than the code and the programmers; it’s about the community and the power of the crowd to produce amazing products. Every successful (key word being ‘successful’) open source project is backed by a community of developers and application users who keep it alive and kicking. While there are ways to make money off of working on open source, you’ll find that many of these community members perform their duties to keep learning, to share knowledge, out of a love for the product and a sense of obligation to the community.

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My delicious bookmarks for 2010-04-16

  • SeeClickFix
    Report non-emergency issues, receive alerts in your neighborhood
  • Opensource University
    A learning portal with a focus on open source applications.
  • WordPress Template Creation Tutorial
  • Pligg CMS
    Pligg is an open source CMS (Content Management System) that you can download and use for free. Pligg CMS provides social networking software that encourages visitors to register on your website so that they can submit content and connect with other users.
  • Elgg
    Elgg is free and open source software. It provides the components you need to build a fully-featured social environment.
  • Lovd By Less
    Open Source Social Network
  • insoshi
    insoshi is a social networking platform in Ruby on Rails. You can use Insoshi to make custom social networks.
  • XOOPS CMS
    XOOPS is a web application platform written in PHP for the MySQL database. Its object orientation makes it an ideal tool for developing small or large community websites, intra company and corporate portals, weblogs and much more.
  • Community Engine
    CommunityEngine is a free, open-source social network plugin for Ruby on Rails applications. Drop it into your new or existing application, and you?ll instantly have all the features of a basic community site.

More of my links

My delicious bookmarks for 2010-04-15

  • SeeClickFix
    Report non-emergency issues, receive alerts in your neighborhood
  • Opensource University
    A learning portal with a focus on open source applications.
  • WordPress Template Creation Tutorial
  • Pligg CMS
    Pligg is an open source CMS (Content Management System) that you can download and use for free. Pligg CMS provides social networking software that encourages visitors to register on your website so that they can submit content and connect with other users.
  • Elgg
    Elgg is free and open source software. It provides the components you need to build a fully-featured social environment.
  • Lovd By Less
    Open Source Social Network
  • insoshi
    insoshi is a social networking platform in Ruby on Rails. You can use Insoshi to make custom social networks.
  • XOOPS CMS
    XOOPS is a web application platform written in PHP for the MySQL database. Its object orientation makes it an ideal tool for developing small or large community websites, intra company and corporate portals, weblogs and much more.
  • Community Engine
    CommunityEngine is a free, open-source social network plugin for Ruby on Rails applications. Drop it into your new or existing application, and you?ll instantly have all the features of a basic community site.

More of my links

My delicious bookmarks for 2010-04-12

  • museum-dashboard
    A way to create a stats dashboard for your library or museum
  • ReservesDirect
    ReservesDirect is free, open-source software that manages electronic and physical library materials reserved for university courses.
  • The Social OPAC
    Thesocialopac.net is the official website of the Social OPAC application suite–an award-winning, open source social discovery platform for library bibliographic data. The purpose of this site is to build a cohesive community of users and developers around the SOPAC project suite.
  • Blacklight: Project Info
    A next generation library catalog written in ruby, using solr as the underlying search engine.
  • VuFind
    VuFind is a library resource portal designed and developed for libraries by libraries.
  • Omeka
    Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. Its ?five-minute setup? makes launching an online exhibition as easy as launching a blog.
  • WordPress
  • Joomla In Libraries
    Here you will find Articles, Tutorials, Helpful Information, and a Community of Joomla! Enthusiasts to help you transform your library website into a powerful content portal.
  • drupalib
    A place for library drupallers to hang out
  • Drupal
    An open source content management platform.
  • Pidgin
    Universal chat client
  • Zotero
  • Evergreen open source library system
  • Koha Open Source Integrated Library System
  • Ubuntu

More of my links

Links in Google Calendar Events

When I was teaching my WordPress class recently a librarian asked me if they could link to the registration page from their Google Calendar (the one I told them to embed in their WordPress site) – and I said I didn’t think so. Now, I don’t remember who that librarian was so I’m going to share this with you all and hope that she’s reading :)

In a recent post by Allie Jordan on LibraryTechTalk I learned that it is possible to put links in your Google Calendar events. Her post talks about how to use Google Docs & Calendar for event registration at your library. This tutorial is a must read if you’re using Google Apps in your library!!

Free version of TypePad Available

So, you all know I’m a strong WordPress supporter – and you may not know – but I’m no real fan of TypePad because it seems so restrictive for my purposes. That said, I have friends who do like and use TypePad and the point of this site is to share things I learned – and today I learned that there is now a free version of TypePad called TypePad Micro. So if you want to use TypePad you may want to check out the TypePad by using TypePad Micro.

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